Physical Activity Need: Under-5s

Daily physical activity is essential for healthy development & growth of infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers.

Physical Activity: More Is Better.

Infants (< 1 year):

Encourage Supervised floor-based play in safe environments:

  • - Mobile Infants: should be physically active several times every day include interactive floor-based activity, e.g. crawling.
  • - Infants not mobile: Target at least 30 minutes of tummy time in 24 hours. Encourage movements like reaching, grasping, pushing & pulling independently, or rolling over);
  • - Keep In Mind: Babies are not familiar with Tummy time at first. Gradually increase by a minute or two at a time till they get used to it.
  • - Prevent / avoid babies from sleeping on their tummies.
Toddlers (1-2 years):

Target: at least 3 hours (180 minutes ) of physical activity in a day.

Pre-schoolers (3-4 years):

Target: At least 3 hours (180 minutes ) per day (of this 60 mins to be of moderate-to-vigorous intensity) of physical activity.

Sedentary Behaviour:

Children up to 5 years of age should not be sedentary for more than one hour at a time, except while sleeping.

Children < than 2 years of age:

Should not spend any time watching television or using other electronic media (DVDs, computer and other electronic games).

Children 2 to 5 years of age:

Limit to one hour watching television and the use of other electronic media.

physical activity birth

Guidelines for 5-18

Target: Establish the development of motor and social skills while creating opportunities for children to make friends.

Physical Activity: More is Better

Aerobic Exercise:

At least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity every day.

SMBA: (Strengthen muscle & bone Activity) & movement skills ---

At least three days per week

  • - Additional health benefits, accrue if children engage in activity – up to several hours per day.
Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines

Target: Minimise the time they spend being sedentary every day to reduce health risks.

Limit Upto 2 hours a day : use of electronic media for entertainment (e.g. television, seated electronic games and computer use).

Break up long periods of sitting as often as possible and do light activity.

physical activity 5-18 years

Physical Activity: More is Better

Target: Develop or maintain strength in the major muscle groups. These could include heavy gardening, carrying heavy shopping, or resistance exercise.

Aerobic Exercise:

150 - 300 minutes (2 1/2 – 5 hours) of moderate intensity activity (such as brisk walking or cycling);

or

75 – 150 minutes (11/5 – 21/2 hours) of vigorous intensity activity (such as running);

or

Shorter durations of very vigorous intensity activity (such as sprinting or stair climbing);

or

a combination of moderate, vigorous and very vigorous intensity activity.


MSBA: (Muscle Strengthen muscle & bone Activity):

Improve their physical function by undertaking activities aimed at improving or maintaining muscle strength, balance and flexibility.

Muscle Strengthening:

At least two days a week, but any strengthening activity is better than none.

Work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms)
Challenge muscles by adding weight (roughly 1 to 2 pounds for arms, 2 to 5 pounds for legs) or using a stronger resistance band.

Balance-enhancing

At least two days a week, but any balancing activity is better than none:
Undertake tai chi, yoga, and Pilates. Strength training exercises that work core muscles in your abdomen and back also help with balance.

Bone Health: Do Weight-bearing that impact and maintain bone health.


physical activity adults

Sedentary Behaviour

Minimise time spent in prolonged sitting. Break up, as often as possible, long periods of sitting with light activity.

Take an assessment to assess your Physical Activity Status. Click here

Objective: Maintain good physical and mental health, wellbeing, and social functioning

Physical Activity: More The Better:

Daily Physical Acitvity: Some physical activity is better than none: even light activity brings some health benefits compared to being sedentary.

CAUTION: Individuals who had stopped or not done any physical activity, or starting a new physical activity, should start at a beginners level and gradually build up to recommended amount

Aerobic Exercise:

Start gradually and build weekly to a minimum of:

150 minutes (two and a half hours) of moderate intensity aerobic activity,

or

75 minutes of vigorous intensity activity,

or

A combination of moderate and vigorous activity, to achieve greater benefits.

MSBA: (Muscle Strengthen muscle & bone Activity):

Improve their physical function by undertaking activities aimed at improving or maintaining muscle strength, balance and flexibility.

Muscle Strengthening:

Work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms)
Challenge muscles by adding weight (roughly 1 to 2 pounds for arms, 2 to 5 pounds for legs) or using a stronger resistance band.

Frequency:

2 days per week. These could be combined with sessions involving moderate aerobic activity

or

Additional sessions aimed specifically at these components of fitness.

Do minimum of one set of 12 times ( reps) But 2-3 even better.

Keep a 48 hour gap to allow the muscles to repair between sessions


physical activity disabled adults

Balance-enhancing

At least two days a week, but any balancing activity is better than none:

Undertake tai chi, yoga, and Pilates. Strength training exercises that work core muscles in your abdomen and back also help with balance.

Flexibility Exercises:

With aging and disuse the muscles shorten & tighten. This makes a person vulnerable to injuries & to problems of back pain and balance.

Activity: Undertake stretches and yoga to gently reverse this.

Sedentary Activity:

Break up prolonged periods of being sedentary with light activity when physically possible, or at least with standing, as this has distinct health benefits for older people.

Take an assessment to assess your Physical Activity Status. Click here

Pregnancy

Physical Activity: More is Better

Target: Remain active through our your pregnancy and postpartum confers benefits on both maternal and fetal health: decreases risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, & diabetes, excessive weight gain, reduces delivery complications and postpartum depression, and fewer newborn complications, no adverse effects on birth weight; and no increase in risk of stillbirth.

Aerobic Exercise:

150 - 300 minutes (2 1/2 – 5 hours) of light intensity activity (such as walking);

Muscle Strengthening:

Pelvic Strengthening Exercises should be done daily

Sedentary Behaviour

Pregnant and postpartum women should limit the amount of time spent being sedentary. Replacing sedentary time with physical activity of any intensity (including light intensity) provides health benefits. Break up, as often as possible, long periods of sitting with light activity.

Monitor and track your Pregnancy. Take an assessment Click here

Assess your diet & Physical Activity status & build the right Plan for you. Click Here

pregnant-women

After Birth

Safe return to exercise after pregnancy

Exercise makes you stronger and improve mood. Check with a health professional before starting

Benefits of Exercise:
  • - Regular exercise strengthen and tone your muscles.
  • - Raise your energy levels.
  • - And also lose weight and become fitter.
  • - Improves mental wellbeing.
  • - Relieves stress and helps prevent postnatal depression.

Do the best you can – even 10 minutes is better than nothing.

After vaginal birth
  • - Here start pelvic floor exercises from the first day after the birth.
  • - Exercise your abdominal muscles when you feel able to.
  • - Start with a gentle walk. Gradually increase its time & pace.

Build up to a 30-minute walk every day if you can.

Exercise after caesarean

A caesarean takes at least 6 weeks to heal.

  • - Here start pelvic floor exercises from the first day after the birth.
  • - Exercise your abdominal muscles when you feel able to.
  • - Avoid sit ups, crunches or abdominal curls, as these put pressure on the scar.
  • - Avoid lifting heavy weights.
  • - Tighten your tummy and keep your back straight if you need to lift something around the house.
after childbirth

At 6 to 8 weeks:

  • - OK to start walking, do low-impact aerobics or cycle.
  • - Stop if there is any discomfort, pain or a pulling sensation on your scar and try again a couple of weeks later.
Till 3-4 months after pregnancy:
  • - Avoid high-impact exercise
  • - Starting swimming
  • - Starting gym or group exercise.
  • - Heavy Weights
Low-risk exercise in Post Partum
  • - Abdominal exercises, or ‘abdominal bracing’: 8 to 12 times, 4 times a day
  • - Pelvic floor exercises: 8 to 12 times, 4 times a day
  • - Walking, cycling
  • - swimming and aqua aerobics (once the bleeding has stopped)
  • - yoga, Pilates
  • - low-impact aerobics. light weight training